State Independent Living Council Discussion Archive

NATSILC: Real Choices The Indiana Way

Posted by: Lou Diehl
Date Mailed: Monday, June 16th 2003 09:19 AM

From: ForCompliance@aol.com
Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 10:22:05 EDT
Subject: REAL CHOICES THE INDIANA WAY

INDIANA'S REAL CHOICES THIS TIME: USE REAL SYSTEMS CHANGE GRANTS FOR REAL
SYSTEMS CHANGES?  NAH. FUND PROVIDERS TO TRAIN THEMSELVES, BUY ELECTRONIC
MONITORING SYSTEMS OR FORM COMMUNITY POLICYING SQUADS. 

LAST TIME THE STATE 'BOUGHT' TRAINING VIDEOS, A MINI-VAN AND EXCERCISE
PROGRAMS FOR 'FRAIL ELDERLY.'

This information was sent to the Alliance by the Indiana Federation of
Centers for Independent Living, a coalition of CILs who are demanding that
Indiana keep its commitment to afford their consumer-directed entities an
active role in bringing about the state's compliance with the Supreme
Court's Olmstead Commission. 

Two years ago, its members were instrumental in holding a state-wide
series of opportunities for public input from folks who were in danger of
being institutionalized or had gotten out and were worried about having to
go back in.  Thousands attended, giving the state the real deal about how
the system needed to change. 

IFCIL members told the state that the last thing folks needed was for
Indiana to do another round of mini-grants that did little but reward
folks for maintaining the status quo.  They offered their assistance,
expertise and connection with national leaders who had fought for the Real
Choice dollars in the first place. 

State staff then set aside $315,000 a year in the State Plan for
Independent Living, telling the Centers that they had to each hire a new
staffperson for $35,000 to "do Olmtead."  IFCIL members didn't see hiring
the most productive and effective use of those funds, but it didn't
matter, because the state renegged on even that committment, deciding
instead to -- guess what? Award mini-grants. 

The Governor kicked all of the original task force members off and got
himself a new crew that wouldn't question that decision.  All but three of
the members of his new "Commission" (led by a high-paid consultant) are
folks with no prior knowledge of or involvement in disability rights
issues. Al Tolbert (see previous DIMENET Postings) was selected to
represent Independent Living, but has said that it's not his job to tell
anyone on the council or other centers what's going on, they'll just have
to go to the meetings themselves.  Ed Bell (also see previous DIMENET
postings) was put in charge of the consumer advisory committee for the new
commission. Guess who was among those who received the first round of
minni-grants? 

Efforts to have representatives from the Indiana Statewide Council on
Independent Living, and staff from the Division on Disability, Aging and
Rehabilitative Services explain why funds didn't go to the Centers for
Independent Living to work on real systemic changes, have been
unsuccessful.  They won't discuss it. 

From:    MacGregor, Scott   On Behalf Of Office of Communications
Sent:    Thursday, May 22, 2003 2:04 PM
To:      #FSSA (All Staff)
Subject: Governor's Commission awards mini-grants for community 
         partnerships
 
Communities across Indiana benefit from mini-grants from the
Governor's Commission on Home- and Community- Based Care.
Please help support the project in your area.

               NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release 
May 22, 2003            
 
Governor's Commission awards mini-grants for community partnerships Funds
help Hoosiers live as independently as possible in their homes and
communities

Working to expand home- and community-based services for the elderly and
people with disabilities, the Indiana Family and Social Services
Administration and the Governor's Commission on Home- and Community-Based
Care today awarded a second round of 11 federally-funded mini-grants
totaling $320,000 to communities across Indiana. The grants -- designed
for Hoosiers at risk of being institutionalized or currently in an
institution or nursing home -- help people with limited options live as
independently as possible in their homes and communities. 

Instead of distributing larger grants to a few communities, the Commission
is geographically distributing a greater number of smaller grants
throughout the state - up to $40,000 each. Projects must encourage
innovation in the areas of community living arrangements, housing,
transportation, supported employment and caregiver support. 

Grantees in the second round of awards include: 

*   establishing a coalition in Warsaw to decrease incarceration of the
mentally ill by developing protocol for community policing

*    training for Indianapolis housing suppliers and consumers to increase
availability of community-based housing for people with disabilities

*    support for Bloomington's continuum of services for adults with
developmental disabilities and/or mental illness, reducing costly medical
visits and increasing their level of independence

*    education for providers on the Medical Rehabilitation Option to
support service capacity for children with Severe Emotional Disturbances
(SED) statewide
 
"This grant will help us increase independent living services to youth," 
said Cathleen Graham, executive director of IARCCA, which received the
statewide grant for children with SED. "We're trying to do more early
intervention, and this grant speaks to the goal to increase the capacity
of services to children and families in their communities. " 

The mini-grants are supported by the Real Systems Change Grant, funded by
the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The Governor' s
Commission aimed to maximize funds by working with matching funds and
other funding sources in local communities. Only grants that fostered
community partnerships were considered. All grantees must provide a 10
percent match from a non-federal source, preferably from a community
partnership or foundation. 

"FSSA is committed to working with the Governor's Commission to provide
high-quality services in the most integrated settings possible,"  FSSA
Secretary John Hamilton said.  "The partnerships formed by these grants
will help many families see their loved ones remain active in the
community - and still receive quality care and supervision." 

The Commission was created by Governor Frank O'Bannon to develop short-
and long-term strategies to create or expand community capacity for
persons at risk of being institutionalized, or for those currently in an
institution or nursing home, within Indiana's long-term care service
delivery system. For more information: http://www.in.gov/fssa/community

A list of the grantees folows. 

MINI-GRANT SECOND ROUND

1.  Interfaith Hospitality Network, Indianapolis (Central Region) Homeless
Families $31,500 Service to approximately 50 families with a
bio-psycho-social assessment, information and referral case management and
clinical services per the individual's family needs.  Families with
at-risk kids and MI are served. 

2.  Key Consumer Organization, Indianapolis (Central) $22,027 To promote
recovery for consumers with mental illness by providing Wellness Recover
Action Plan (WRAP) training to 20 consumers who will use the training to
train others.  A resource guide to assist persons with mental illness to
receive a post secondary education will be developed and shared with the
MI population and service providers who work with that population. 

3.  Indiana Housing Finance Authority, Indianapolis (Statewide) $35,000 To
create methods to permanently fund the Indiana Housing Trust Fund f or the
purpose of building housing capacity for persons with developmental and
physical disabilities, mental illness, and senior citizens. 

4.  Independent Residential Living, New Palestine (Central) $33,300 To
develop resources that enable home-owners with disabilities, particularly
low to moderate income, elderly and rural persons, to access local
services that provide needed home repairs/modifications so that these
persons may remain in their own homes. 

5.  Bowen Center, Kosciusko (North Central) $24,550 To implement a
community policing protocol and standard operating procedure to help meet
the needs of mentally ill persons at risk of institutionalization by the
establishment of a community coalition team consisting of consumers,
families, community leaders, law enforcement, treatment providers, and
not-for-profit community agencies.  Therefore, when persons with MI
interact with law enforcement during a crisis, the protocol can be
followed and the risk of incarceration can be decreased. 

6.  Indiana Association of Community Economic Development, Indianapolis
(Statewide) $31,429 To implement a series of training and outreach
activities that increase the availability of community based housing to
persons with disabilities.  Two specific markets will be targeted: housing
suppliers and housing consumers. 

7.  Indiana Chapter of Professional Case Managers, Indianapolis
(Statewide) $31,428 To develop a case management training curriculum
modules for professional case managers to be delivered across the state by
certified trainers

8.  Warsaw Community Schools, Warsaw (North Central) $25,342 To develop a
vocational program for "at-risk" and disabled students at the Alternative
School.  Vocational training can assist in transition to work for this
population.  This Alternative School currently offers only an educational
component. 

9.  Wabash Center, Lafayette (North Central $27,921 To obtain overnight
support by electronic monitoring from an off-site system that offers a
quick response, if needed.  Electronic monitoring is much less expensive
than overnight staff costs. 

10.  IARCCA, Indianapolis (Statewide) $26,075 To develop a comprehensive
training program that will educate providers on the Medicaid
Rehabilitation Option as a resource for maximizing dollars to support a
comprehensive array of services for children and families and promote
capacity building. 

11.  Center for Behavioral Health, Bloomington (South Central) $31,428 To
deliver additional components to the community's continuum designed
specifically to meet the needs of adults with dual diagnosis to reduce
costly medical visits and to increase autonomy and self-determination

TOTAL $320,000




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