National Council on Disability Document Archive

Accessing .PDF files -- ACC_PDF.TXT

Posted by: Jamal Mazrui
Date Mailed: Monday, July 7th 1997 12:12 PM

The following is a compilation of information about converting the
Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (a .PDF file) to HTML or
plain text that may be read with almost any web browser or document
viewer.  Converting this graphical display of web content is still
imprecise and sometimes ineffective, but provides additional
accessibility to screen readers and other adaptive equipment used
by people with disabilities.  Conversions are now possible by input
form, proxy server, or email reply.  More information is available
from the Internet site http://access.adobe.com

----------

               Adobe Systems Logo Welcome to Access at Adobe!



   Helping people with visual disabilities access electronic information.



   This page is your launching point for learning more about universal
   access to Adobe products.

   Learn more about accessing Adobe Acrobat (PDF) files if you are
   blind or vision impaired.

   Announcing access.adobe.com!

     * Try out the simple form to get an HTML version of any Acrobat
       PDF document on the Internet.
     * Try out the advanced form to get an HTML version of any Acrobat
       PDF document on the Internet.

   Please use the forms for submitting only URLs to PDF files



   New! Convert PDF Files to HTML or ASCII Text by Email!

   There are two new email addresses at Adobe for getting PDF files
   converted to HTML or to ASCII Text.

     * pdf2html@adobe.com -- email an URL to a PDF file and receive the
       HTML version by email
     * pdf2txt@adobe.com -- email an URL to a PDF file and receive the
       ASCII text version by email

   New! access.adobe.com Frequently Asked Questions

   To find out more about Adobe Systems, Incorporated, please visit our
   web site at http://www.adobe.com.







    Send Adobe your feedback!

   Copyright ~ 1997 Adobe Systems Incorporated.
   All rights reserved.
   Legal notices and trademark attributions.

----------
Access.adobe.com

  Helping people with visual disabilities access electronic information

   Now there is a way for the blind to access Acrobat (PDF) documents:
   access.adobe.com available free from Adobe. The Access server allows
   you to read any Acrobat document on the Web, using your familiar Web
   browser. It converts Acrobat documents on the Internet into HTML
   easily, which can then be read by common screen-reading programs. All
   you need is the ability to browse the Web. Here's a sample Acrobat
   document that has been converted to HTML. Also, check out a
   detailed white paper about Acrobat Access.

   There are two options for using the access.adobe.com server to convert
   Acrobat PDF documents into HTML: converting by proxy and converting by
   form. The choice allows you to pick the service that is most
   convenient to you.

   Access.adobe.com
     * Why convert Acrobat (PDF) documents to HTML?
     * Converting by Proxy
     * Converting by Form

   If you want to read PDF files that are not on the Internet, there is a
   Windows plug-in available.

----------
Overview of Access.adobe.com

  Why Convert Acrobat (PDF) Documents to HTML?

   Converting Acrobat documents to a simple type of HTML will allow you
   to read the documents in an application you are already familiar with
   - your World Wide Web Browser. During the conversion process, the PDF
   accessibility issues for the blind are solved by extracting the text
   of the document out in an approximate reading order, and then
   formatting the resulting HTML document as a single column.

   In addition to getting text in reading order when an Acrobat (PDF)
   document is converted, the electronic navigation features associated
   with PDF are preserved.

   First, all of the existing hypertext links are converted into HTML
   links. This includes intra-document links as well as links to other
   document on the Internet.

   Additionally, when the Acrobat document is converted to HTML, some
   extra HTML links are created to enable easy navigation between Acrobat
   pages. The very first line of the document will contain at least two
   of these special links:

     * Document Body is a special link to take you to the start of the
       body of the document.
     * Page Navigation Panel is a special link that takes you to a part
       of the document that contains links that point to each page of the
       document. For example, if the document has five pages, the Page
       Navigation Panel would have 1 2 3 4 5 , which would all be linked
       to their respective pages.

   If the PDF document contains Acrobat bookmarks (these are different
   than the bookmarks associated with the Netscape browser and are like
   an electronic table of contents feature), then the PDF to HTML
   convertor will place a third special link on the first line of the
   converted document:

     The Document Outline link points to another special area of the
       document which contains links created from the original Acrobat
       bookmarks.



   Lastly, between each page of the document, links are inserted to make
   it easy for you to move to the next and previous page.

   Want to try out the convertor? This link points to an example
   Acrobat document that you can read as HTML.

  The Two access.adobe.com Services

   The access.adobe.com services allow you to easily get any Acrobat
   (PDF) document on the Internet as simple HTML in two ways.

   If you are using a World Wide Web browser, Adobe recommends that you
   try out the access.adobe.com proxy server. Using a proxy server
   provides the most seamless method to get accessible Acrobat documents:
   getting an HTML version of a PDF document is as simple as browsing any
   HTML page. To find out how to set up your proxy server, go to the
   proxy page.

   Not everyone, however, will be able to use the access.adobe.com proxy
   server. If you are accessing the World Wide Web through an Internet
   firewall, you will not be able to connect to the access.adobe.com
   proxy server. (This is a technical limitation of the commercially
   available proxy servers.) Instead, the best way for you to get the
   HTML version of any PDF document on the Internet is to submit a URL to
   access.adobe.com through your browser. To find out how to submit a
   URL to access.adobe.com, go to the forms page.

   What if your Acrobat documents are not available on the Internet? Take
   a look at the Acrobat Access plug-in for Microsoft Windows.

----------
  PDF and Adobe(R) Acrobat(R) Viewers for the Visually Disabled

   February 14th, 1997
   Liz McQuarrie
   Adobe Systems Incorporated
   _________________________________________________________________

   Adobe's Portable Document Format, the native file format of the Adobe
   Acrobat products, is a final form description language for documents
   that is not tied to any operating system or application. PDF provides
   the document graphic richness of Adobe PostScript(R) and allows
   publishers to retain the look and feel of their publications. On the
   World Wide Web, PDF is becoming increasingly popular for documents
   that need the layout richness that HTML currently does not provide.
   Corporations are also using PDF to distribute electronic documents
   over corporate networks, via e-mail, or on CD-ROM.

   For the visually disabled, however, there are some accessibility
   issues associated with PDF and the use of Adobe Acrobat viewers
   (Reader and Exchange(R)) for viewing PDF files. This document
   describes Adobe's plans for making both the Adobe Acrobat viewing
   products and the PDF file format accessible for the visually disabled.



    Overview of Acrobat and PDF Accessibility Plans
   _________________________________________________________________

   Adobe has the following plans to make PDF and the Adobe Acrobat
   products accessible to the visually disabled:

     * Provide on-the-fly conversion of any PDF document on the Internet
       to HTML using a World Wide Web server. This service, called
       access.adobe.com, is available now.
     * Offer Adobe Acrobat Access on Microsoft(R) Windows(R) for reading
       PDF documents that are not on the Internet. The plug-in will allow
       users to access Acrobat for Windows through cooperation with
       Windows screen reading programs, as well as output to formatted
       ASCII and HTML. A Beta version of Acrobat Access is also
       available now.
     * Enhance the PDF format and Adobe Acrobat for Logical Document
       Structure. For visually disabled users, the PDF structure project
       will deliver a higher quality reading order.



    Adobe Acrobat Viewers and Microsoft Windows Screen Readers
   _________________________________________________________________

   Screen reader programs allow the visually disabled to interact with
   the Windows interface by interpreting what is happening on the display
   and outputting that information to speech synthesis or refreshable
   Braille output devices. Although screen reader programs for DOS have
   been around for many years, screen reader programs for Microsoft
   Windows providing reasonable performance and functionality have only
   been introduced in the last year or so.



    Limited Screen Model and PDF Documents
   _________________________________________________________________

   The delay in the availability of Windows screen readers is due to a
   number of factors. First, it is quite an intellectual challenge to
   present what is happening on the Windows display to a visually
   disabled person in a meaningful way. This is because with Windows (or
   any other GUI-based operating system), there may be multiple
   applications open simultaneously, each of which has a title bar,
   menus, and several child windows for their data. Each application also
   has many visual controls to present such as icons, scroll bars, and
   dialog boxes that include check boxes, buttons, and list boxes.

   To keep track of what is happening on the screen, Windows screen
   readers build what is referred to as an off-screen model in memory and
   then allow the user to navigate through the screen model. For example,
   from the screen reader, the user can select a particular application
   window to interact with. Then once an application is selected, the
   user can navigate and read text in the window. Reading text usually
   involves using commands like "Next Line," which reads the next line
   down the page, and "Previous Word," which reads the word immediately
   to the left of the current word.

   The current screen models for Windows for handling the text that is in
   an application-specific window are very similar to the models
   developed for DOS. These models can typically only represent text in
   simple documents, where the document contains a single column of text
   that flows left to right and top to bottom on the page. They cannot
   properly represent documents with more complex layout, such as a
   multi-column newspaper or documents with text that is not horizontal,
   such as a tax form that contains vertical labels. When the screen
   reader program encounters such complex layout in an application, it
   will likely make mistakes. For example, in a multi-column document,
   the screen reader would probably read the first line in the first
   column, followed by the first line in the second column, running the
   columns together as if they were on the same line. Because many PDF
   documents have such rich layout, the use of Windows screen readers
   with Acrobat on these documents will not produce useful output for the
   visually disabled person.

   For the future, Adobe is participating in discussions with Microsoft
   Windows screen reader vendors regarding a new Application Programming
   Interface to screen readers in Windows that will more fully support
   complex documents.



    Conflicts Between the Acrobat Viewers and the Screen Readers
   _________________________________________________________________

   The second factor that has delayed development of capable Windows
   screen reader programs is that there are no easy operating system
   "hooks" (or entry points) in the current operating system (Windows
   3.1) for developers to use to build the screen readers. Microsoft has
   begun adding such hooks to Windows 95. The net result of this
   oversight is that developers of Windows screen readers have each
   independently invented incompatible techniques for capturing screen
   state for alternative output devices.

   Also, the Windows version of the Adobe Acrobat Viewer technically
   pushes the Windows environment in order to render visually beautiful
   documents with fonts that are very close to the author's original
   fonts. This fact often causes the Acrobat viewer products to be
   incompatible with many screen readers. Screen readers are not able to
   read any text in the Acrobat document windows, regardless of the
   layout. (Note that Acrobat Access solves this problem.)



    access.adobe.com: PDF to HTML Conversion on a World Wide Web Server
    ______________________________________________________________________

   access.adobe.com is a new way to get accessible Acrobat (PDF)
   documents. Instead of reading PDF, you can read HTML versions of any
   PDF document on the Internet by having it converted on-the-fly for you
   on the access.adobe.com World Wide Web server. Now you can read
   Acrobat documents using your already familiar Web browser.

   All you need is either an Internet email account or the ability to get
   to the World Wide Web and you can read any Acrobat document on the
   Internet.

   Note that you have three different options for utilizing the
   access.adobe.com services to convert Acrobat PDF documents to HTML.
   This choice of options allows you to pick the service that is most
   convenient for you.

   What if your Acrobat documents are not available on the Internet?
   Please take a look at the Acrobat Access plug-in for Microsoft Windows
   below.

    The Solution for Documents That are Not on the Internet: Acrobat Access
   _________________________________________________________________

   To make PDF documents that are not on the Internet accessible to
   visually disabled users of Microsoft Windows, Adobe has developed a
   special plug-in for Acrobat. (A "plug-in" is software that works with
   the standard Acrobat product and enhances its capability.) This
   plug-in is called Acrobat Access.

   Acrobat Access presents an alternative view of the open document in a
   separate window. This view contains the text in as close to reading
   order as possible, including presenting multi-column documents as a
   single column and "straightening" all non-horizontal text.

   Acrobat Access interacts with the primary Acrobat document display as
   seamlessly as possible and allows the use of all standard Acrobat
   features, such as access to annotations and hypertext links. Also,
   Acrobat Access allows users to export from PDF to HTML 2.0, as well as
   to formatted ASCII.

   A Beta version of the Acrobat Access for Windows is available now free
   of charge on Adobe's Web site. Acrobat Access works with both the free
   Acrobat Reader product as well as Acrobat Exchange. Acrobat Reader
   3.0 is the latest Acrobat release, and can also be downloaded for free
   from Adobe's Web site.

    Extensions to PDF for Document Logical Structure
   _________________________________________________________________

   The third area of interest regarding PDF and the visually disabled
   concerns document logical structure. ("Logical structure" refers to
   the organization of the document, such as title page, chapters,
   sections, and subsections.) Although standard ASCII may be adequate
   for disabled users' access to short documents, access to longer, more
   complex documents is greatly enhanced by an understanding of the
   document's logical structure. Many advocates for the visually disabled
   feel that documents based on SGML are best suited for accessibility
   because of SGML's strength in representing document logical structure
   in a portable way. Documents based on SGML, however, continue to be a
   small percentage of those that a visually disabled person may
   encounter on a day-to-day basis.



    Document Structure Knowledge Leads to a Better Acrobat Access
   _________________________________________________________________

   Acrobat Access will be greatly enhanced by knowledge of the document's
   logical structure being able to do a much better job of displaying the
   document in reading order. Consider, for example, a PDF document that
   is a newspaper, where the first page contains the beginnings of three
   articles, each of which is continued on a separate page. With a
   knowledge of the document structure, Acrobat Access will be able to
   follow a single article from beginning to end, much like a sighted
   person would flip the newspaper page to continue the article until
   complete. Also, Acrobat Access could do an even better job of
   exporting to HTML by supporting a richer set of HTML tags.



    Availability of Structure in PDF
   _________________________________________________________________

   A shipping date for products from Adobe that include document logical
   structure in PDF is not currently scheduled.



   Want to know more about Adobe's accessibility solutions for
   Acrobat?

   Comments or Questions?


    Liz McQuarrie
    Adobe Systems Incorporated
    lmcquarr@adobe.com
    408-536-3915

----------
                 access.adobe.com - Frequently Asked Questions
     _________________________________________________________________

     * I can't use your proxy server. Is the software available in a
       package I can put on my local intranet?
     * How do I enter a URL to the PDF file I want converted?
     * I converted my PDF file to HTML without an error, but the
       results seem incomplete, or "Jumbled up" ?
     * The PDF file I want to convert is protected by a password. How
       do I get past this protection?
     * When will a Macintosh version of the access plug-in be
       available?
     * How do I submit PDF files that are on an FTP server?
     * How do I configure the Lynx browser to use "access.adobe.com"
       as a proxy server?
     * How do I use the two PDF conversion mail addresses (pdf2html
       and pdf2txt)?
     * Can I submit a file via mail as a mime attachment?
     _________________________________________________________________





I can't use your proxy server. Is the software available in a package I can put
on my local intranet?

   Unfortunately, the conversion technology on access.adobe.com is not
   currently packaged in such a way that we can make it available to run
   on servers outside of Adobe. We are just now beginning to formulate
   our plans in this regard, and you can help. If such a package would be
   useful to you, send us a message and tell us what your needs are. Why
   would this work better for you than access.adobe.com? What kind of
   server would you be running the package on? We'll add your name to the
   list of people who are interested, and keep you informed as our
   planning progresses.





How do I enter a URL to the PDF file I want converted?

   In order for either of the access.adobe.com conversion forms to find,
   and open the file you want converted, you will have to enter a
   functional URL (Uniform Resource Locator). A URL consists of 3 parts,
   and has the following format:

   protocol://servername.com/:port/path

   The first part is the server protocol for the server where the PDF
   file you want to convert is located. If it's on a real web server the
   protocol is "http". Otherwise, it's either "ftp", "gopher" or "wais".
   If you don't know which server protocol the server your working with
   uses, your network administrator will probably be able to help you
   figure it out.

   The second part is the server name. That is the network name of the
   machine the web server is located on. With some SLIP or PPP
   connections, there might not even be a network name, just a number;
   something like 134.7.14.109. You can use this number as the network
   name.

   If the server has been installed on a port other than the default of
   80 you will have to include the port number. Once again, if you don't
   know this information, your network administrator should be able to
   help you.

   The third part of the URL is the path. The root of this path begins
   with the directory containing the "Home Page" through which you gained
   access to the file, and ends with the full name of the file. This file
   name must include the .PDF file extension.

   TIP: Most web browsers' display and/or provide some way to copy or
   otherwise get access to the full URL of the link you are currently
   pointing at with your mouse. For instance, Netscape will allow you to
   copy the URL to the clipboard if you click the right mouse button on a
   link. URL's copied in this way can then be pasted into the URL field
   in the access.adobe.com conversion form.





I converted my PDF file to HTML without an error, but the results seem
incomplete, or "Jumbled up" ?

   The problem is probably that the text in the converted HTML file has
   NOT been correctly re-organized to follow the reading order of the
   "stories" in the original PDF document.

   The performance of access.adobe.com as far as reading order depends a
   great deal on the characteristics of the PDF document. The visual
   richness of the typical PDF document presents a special challenge when
   trying to organize the text it contains into a logical reading order.
   It can have a complex, layout that includes images with captions, side
   bars, multiple columns of text, story threads that end in the middle
   of one page and continue several pages later, text on a curve,
   vertical text, and sometimes even invisible text! The PDF file format
   does not include any document structure information, so the
   translation software has to guess at the structure based on content.

   There is a setting on the "Advanced PDF to HTML Conversion Form" that
   effects the way the conversion software analyzes the reading order of
   the PDF document. If your current results were obtained with the Proxy
   server, or with the "Simple PDF to HTML Conversion Form", try using
   the advanced form, and select "Alternative Reading Order" in the
   "Reading Order" list box. This may improve the reading order in the
   resultant HTML file.

   Want to try the advanced form for PDF to HTML Conversion?

   NOTE: Adobe's long term plan for providing logical document structure
   information in the PDF file will solve reading order problems. For
   more information, see the detailed white paper about Acrobat
   Access.





The PDF file I want to convert is protected by a password. How do I get past
this protection?

   The answer to this question depends on how the file was password
   protected. Unfortunately, access.adobe.com can not handle Password, or
   User Name and Password security schemes that are implemented on other
   web servers. If however, the password protection is specific to the
   PDF file, use of the "Advanced PDF to HTML Conversion Form" may allow
   access.adobe.com to open the file.

   Adobe Acrobat Exchange allows a user to save a PDF file with password
   protection. The password is stored in the PDF file, and the Acrobat
   Reader will put up a dialog asking you to enter the password whenever
   you try to open it. Access.adobe.com provides support for getting past
   this form of password protection. There is a "Password" field on the
   "Advanced PDF to HTML Conversion Form", where you can enter the
   password for the file you are converting. Provided with the correct
   password, access.adobe.com should be able to convert the file to HTML.

   If possible contact the person who originally posted the PDF file, and
   find out if it has a password, and if so, what that password is. Then
   go to the "Advanced PDF to HTML Conversion Form" and enter the URL for
   the file, and the password.

   Want to try the advanced form for PDF to HTML Conversion?





When will a Macintosh version of the access plug-in be available?

   We do not currently have plans to develop a Macintosh access plug-in.
   Furthermore, we will eventually be phasing out development and support
   of the Windows version of the Access Plug-in. We believe that
   access.adobe.com server provides a better solution for making PDF
   accessible to people with impaired vision.

   After the introduction of the Windows version of the access plug-in,
   we found that, while lots of people had downloaded the Plug-in, only a
   few were actually using it. The primary reason we've found, is that
   given the current state of the art in screen reading technology, it is
   still very difficult for blind people to pick up any Windows
   application and just start using it. The situation is not
   significantly better on the Mac. So, instead of forcing blind people
   to learn Acrobat to be able to read PDF, we decided to give them PDF
   in a format that they could read in an application that they already
   know how to use: their web browser or their email.





How do I submit PDF files that are on an FTP server?

   In order to convert files on an ftp server you must use either the
   form based or E-Mail based conversion methods, and submit a valid URL
   to the file you want to convert. For instance in order convert file
   foo.pdf on ftp server bar, you would specify the URL as
   "ftp://bar/foo.pdf".





How do I configure the Lynx browser to use "access.adobe.com" as a proxy
server?

   If you are using Lynx version 2.2 and beyond you can configure the
   browser to use "access.adobe.com" as a proxy server by setting proxy
   environment variables. Each protocol used by Lynx can be mapped
   seperately using the following PROTOCOL_proxy environment variables:

   UNIX SYSTEMS


             setenv http_proxy "http://access.adobe.com:8080/"


             setenv gopher_proxy "http://access.adobe.com:8080/"


             setenv ftp_proxy "http://access.adobe.com:8080/"


             setenv wais_proxy "http://access.adobe.com:8080/"

   VMS SYSTEMS


              define http_proxy "http://access.adobe.com:8080/"


              define gopher_proxy "http://access.adobe.com:8080/"


              define ftp_proxy "http://access.adobe.com:8080/"


              define wais_proxy "http://access.adobe.com:8080/"

   If you wish to override the use of a proxy server for specific hosts
   or entire domains you may use the "no_proxy" environment variable.
   Here is an example use of "no_proxy":

   UNIX SYSTEMS


              setenv no_proxy "host.domain.dom, domain1.dom, domain2"

   VMS SYSTEMS


              define "no_proxy" "host.domain.dom, domain1.dom, domain2"





How do I use the two PDF conversion mail addresses (pdf2html and pdf2txt)?

   The two PDF conversion e-mail addresses (pdf2html and pdf2txt) at
   adobe.com, can be used to convert a PDF file to HTML or ASCII Text
   respectively. To use either of these mail addresses, simply enter the
   URL to the PDF file you wish to convert into the body of your mail
   message, and send it to the desired mailbox. You will receive the
   converted results in the body of a new mail message, in a matter of
   minutes.





Can I submit a file via mail as a mime attachment?

   The two PDF conversion mail addresses (pdf2html and pdf2txt) at
   adobe.com do not currently support sending the PDF file as a Mime
   attachment. You must include a URL to the document you want to convert
   in the body of the mail message.

----------
How to Use Access.adobe.com by Form

  Converting documents by filling out a form in your browser

   The access.adobe.com PDF to HTML conversion by form is just one of two
   options for getting accessible Acrobat documents over the Internet.

     * What is access.adobe.com PDF to HTML Conversion by Form?
     * How to Report Bugs and Provide Feedback
     * More Information About Acrobat Accessibility

  What is access.adobe.com PDF to HTML Conversion by Form?

   With access.adobe.com PDF to HTML conversion by form, all you have to
   do is type in a URL to a PDF document into an electronic form and
   select the Get This PDF Document As HTML button. The PDF document will
   be converted on-the-fly to HTML, and will be returned to you
   immediately in your browser application.

   The best way to understand this is try it out! There are two forms
   available for you to try:

    1. The simple form. Just type in the URL and submit the form.
    2. The advanced form. This form gives you some extra conversion
       options for formatting the converted HTML document.

   Tip: Once you find the form that you want to use regularly, make a
   bookmark or favorites pointer to it in your browser application so you
   can go back to the form easily.

   Tip: Some URLs are very long and cumbersome to type. Cutting and
   pasting the URL into the form will save you some keystrokes.

  How to Report Bugs or to Provide Feedback

   Please report bugs and provide feedback by sending an e-mail message
   to access-b@adobe.com. Please include the following information:

     * Name
     * Company Name
     * Address
     * E-mail address
     * Phone
     * Operating System
     * CPU
     * Screen Reading Program
     * Web Browser

----------
How to Use the Access.adobe.com by Proxy

  Seamless conversion with your Web browser

   The access.adobe.com proxy server is just one of two options for
   getting accessible Acrobat documents over the Internet.

     * What is a Proxy Server?
     * Can I Use the access.adobe.com Proxy Server?
     * Setting Up Your Browser with access.adobe.com As Your Proxy
       Server
     * How to Report Bugs and Provide Feedback
     * More Information About Acrobat Accessibility

  What is a Proxy Server?

   A proxy server is a special type of World Wide Web server. When you
   set up your Web browser application (for example, the Microsoft
   Internet Explorer or the Netscape Navigator) to use a proxy server,
   the proxy acts as in intermediary between your browser application and
   the server that is providing access to the documents you want to read.
   Once you have set up a proxy, every time you follow a hypertext link
   to read a new page, the proxy server will go out over the Internet and
   get the page from the hosting server.

   Most proxy services are used by companies and organizations that use
   security firewalls (firewalls keep unauthorized users from breaking
   into their internal computers that are linked on the Internet). These
   companies and organizations provide a proxy server for their users to
   connect to for browsing World Wide Web sites that are on the other
   side of this security firewall (on the Internet, not their corporate
   Intranet).

   Adobe Systems maintains a special proxy server on the access.adobe.com
   computer. When you set up your browser to use the access.adobe.com
   proxy server, the server will automatically convert any Acrobat PDF
   document that you request to HTML. The converted document with show up
   in your browser just like any other HTML document that you followed a
   link to read.

   Therefore, if you are able to use the access.adobe.com proxy server,
   you will be able to seamlessly read Acrobat files in your Web browser.
   In fact, reading Acrobat documents through the proxy is so seamless
   that the only way to know that a file originally was an Acrobat
   document and not HTML is to look for a ".pdf" at the end of the URL!

  Can I Use the access.adobe.com Proxy Server?

   Whether or not you can utilize the access.adobe.com proxy server
   depends on how your connection to the World Wide Web and the Internet
   is set up. More specifically, if your are in a corporation or
   organization that has a security firewall, you are most likely already
   using a proxy server. If this is the case, unfortunately, you will not
   be able to use the access.adobe.com proxy server. This is a current
   limitation of the commercially available proxy servers.

   If you cannot use the access.adobe.com proxy server, you can instead
   get Acrobat documents converted to HTML by submitting them to
   access.adobe.com via an electronic form. To find more about
   converting documents by form, go to the forms page.

   If you do not know whether you currently utilize a proxy server, you
   can:

    1. Look at your browser configuration. Directions for examining the
       browser configurations for Microsoft Internet Explorer and
       Netscape Navigator are below.
    2. Find someone who is Internet savvy in your company or organization
       and ask them.
    3. Send an e-mail message to access-b@adobe.com asking for help.

  Setting Up Your Browser with access.adobe.com as Your Proxy Server



    Instructions for Netscape Navigator:

   To configure Netscape Navigator to use a proxy server:

    1. In Netscape Navigator, select the Options menu item, and then
       select the Network submenu.
    2. This will bring up a dialog that contains several tabs. Select the
       Proxies tab.
    3. The dialog will then change and present you with a set of check
       boxes. Check the Manual Proxy box.
    4. To the right next of the Manual Proxy check box there is a button
       labeled View .... Select that button.
    5. When selected, you will be presented with a fairly detailed dialog
       where you can configure proxy servers for various Internet
       protocols. (For example, FTP, Gopher, HTTP.) Tab down to the edit
       box associated with the HTTP protocol and type in access.adobe.com
       as the proxy server name.
    6. Now you must add a port for access.adobe.com. Just to the right of
       the place where you entered the HTTP proxy is another edit box
       that is labeled Port. Type 8080 into this edit box to select port
       8080 on the access.adobe.com computer.
    7. Select OK twice to get rid of all of the Network Options dialogs
       and to save your changes.

   More help on configuring Netscape Navigator is also available at
   the Netscape Web site.

    Instructions for Microsoft Internet Explorer:

   To configure Microsoft Internet Explorer to use a proxy server:

    1. Select the Internet icon in Control Panel.
    2. Select the Advanced tab.
    3. Check the Use Proxy Server checkbox.
    4. In the edit box next to Proxy Server specify
       access.adobe.com:8080.
    5. Select OK to save the changes.

   More help on configuring Microsoft Internet Explorer is also
   available at the Microsoft Web site.



  How to Report Bugs or to Provide Feedback

     Please report bugs and provide feedback by sending an e-mail message
   to access-b@adobe.com. Please include the following information:

     * Name
     * Company Name
     * Address
     * E-mail address
     * Phone
     * Operating System
     * CPU
     * Screen Reading Program
     * Web Browser

----------
Acrobat Access Plug-in for Windows

   If the Acrobat files you want to read are not on the Internet and you
   are a user of Microsoft Windows 3.1, Windows 95, or Windows NT, the
   Acrobat Access plug-in is the solution for you. (A "plug-in" is a
   piece of software that works with the standard Acrobat product and
   enhances its capability.) If the Acrobat files that you wish to
   read are on the Internet, then Adobe recommends you use the
   access.adobe.com server to get HTML versions of these files
   automatically converted for you.

     System Requirements

     Installing Acrobat Access

     Setting Up Your Web Browser With Acrobat and Acrobat Access

     Getting Started With Acrobat Access

     How to Report Bugs and Provide Feedback

  System Requirements

     * 386- or 486-based personal computer (486 recommended)
     * Microsoft Windows 3.1, Microsoft Windows for Workgroups, Microsoft
       Windows 95, or Microsoft Windows NT(R) 3.51 or 4.0
     * 4 MB application RAM
     * 3 MB hard-disk space, plus 2 MB TEMP space available during
       installation
     * For Web integration, any Web browser that allows you to configure
       a helper application by mime type

  Installing Acrobat Access

   Acrobat Access is designed to work with the latest version of the
   Acrobat Reader software, which is distributed free by Adobe Systems
   Incorporated. The Acrobat Reader is available for downloading
   within this site.

   Note that there are two versions: a version of Acrobat for Windows 3.1
   and Windows for Workgroups (16-bit), and a version for Windows 95 and
   Windows NT 3.51(32-bit) or 4.0. Be sure to download the appropriate
   one. IMPORTANT: please ignore any installation instructions regarding
   the configuration of the Netscape(TM) Navigator(TM) Web browser with
   Acrobat. Instead, here are the special instructions for
   configuring any Web browser for use with Acrobat and the Acrobat
   Access plug-in that you will find later in this document.

   Next, to install Acrobat Access, choose either the instructions for
   Microsoft Windows 3.1/Windows for Workgroups OR the instructions for
   Windows 95/Windows NT 3.51 or 4.0 below.

    Microsoft Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups Instructions:

   To install the 16-bit Acrobat Access plug-in for use only with
   Microsoft Windows 3.1 or Microsoft Windows for Workgroups:

     * Download the archive file accs16b2.exe to the plug_ins
       subdirectory where your Acrobat file is installed.
       Download accs16b2.exe (359,415 bytes) updated 20 December 1996

     TIP: By default, the Acrobat Reader will install into the
     c:\acrobat3\read16 directory. The path, therefore the plug_ins
     directory, is probably c:\acrobat3\read16\plug_ins.

     * Execute the accs16b2.exe file by either 1) selecting it from the
       File Manager and pressing Enter or Return. or 2) executing it from
       a MS DOS(R) window. This will invoke the WinZip program, which
       will ask you where you would like to extract the files to. Note
       that by default, WinZip will extract the files into C:\TEMP\ADOBE
       . You will need to change that to extract the files to the reader
       plug-ins directory, which by default will be:
       C:\acrobat3\read16\plug_ins. Once you change the directory to
       extract to, press OK.

     The following files will be placed in the plug_ins directory:

     access.txt
     (Information on installing and getting started with Access)

     access16.api
     (An executable dll for Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups)

     infer16.api
     (Also an executable dll)

     feedback.txt
     (An ASCII feedback form)

     bug form.txt
     (An ASCII bug form)

     accessky.pdf
     (A quick reference to Access)

     access.pdf
     (An on-line help file for Access in PDF format)

     * The PDF help files need to be located in the help subdirectory
       where the Acrobat Reader is installed.

     1) Go to the subdirectory where the Acrobat Reader is installed,
     usually c:\acrobat3\read16:

     C:
     CD \ACROBAT3\READ16
     2) Copy the two PDF files from the plug_ins subdirectory to the
     help subdirectory:

     COPY PLUG_INS\*.PDF HELP

     * Installation requires approximately 1.5 MB of free hard-disk
       space.

    Microsoft Windows 95 or Microsoft Windows NT 3.51 or 4.0 Instructions:

   To install the 32-bit Acrobat Access plug-in for use only with
   Microsoft Windows 95 , Microsoft Windows NT 3.51 or 4.0:

     * Download the archive file accs32b2.exe to the plug_ins
       subdirectory where your Acrobat Reader is installed.

     Download accs32b2.exe (459,632 bytes) updated 20 December 1996

     TIP: By default, the Acrobat Reader will install into the
     c:\acrobat3\ reader directory. The path, therefore, to the plug_ins
     directory is probably c:\acrobat3\reader\plug_ins.

     * Execute the accs32b2.exe file by either 1) selecting it from the
       Windows Explorer and pressing Enter or Return or 2) executing it
       from an MS DOS window. This will invoke the WinZip program, which
       will ask you where you would like to extract the files to. Note
       that by default, WinZip will extract the files into C:\TEMP\ADOBE
       . You will need to change that to extract the files to the reader
       plug-ins directory, which by default will be:
       C:\acrobat3\reader\plug_ins. Once you change the directory to
       extract to, press OK.

     The following files will be placed in the plug_ins directory:
     access.txt
     (Information on installing and getting started with Access)

     access32.api
     (An executable dll for Windows 95 and Windows NT)

     infer32.api
     (Also an executable dll)

     feedback.txt
     (An ASCII feedback form)

     bug form.txt
     (An ASCII bug form)

     accessky.pdf
     (A quick reference to Access)

     access.pdf
     (An on-line help file for Access in PDF format)

     * The pdf help files need to be located in the help subdirectory
       where the Acrobat Reader is installed.

     1) Go to the subdirectory where the Acrobat Reader is installed,
     usually c:\acrobat3\reader:

     C:
     CD \ACROBAT3\READER
     2) Copy the pdf files from the plug_ins subdirectory to the help
     subdirectory:

     COPY PLUG_INS\*.PDF HELP

     * Installation requires approximately 1.5 MB of free hard-disk
       space.

  Setting Up Your Web Browser With Acrobat Reader and Acrobat Access Software

   If you have a Web browser and would like to set up your browser to
   view PDF documents, this section provides instructions on how to
   configure the browser.

   The Acrobat Reader has a special feature for viewing PDF files a page
   at a time in the Netscape Navigator browser window. Unfortunately,
   limitations of the Netscape Application Programming Interface (API) do
   not allow us to offer that capability to users of Acrobat Access.

   Instead, Acrobat Reader will be integrated with your browser as an
   external viewer or helper application. The following instructions are
   for integration with Netscape Navigator 2.0 or greater (note that
   configuring other browsers will be very similar):

    1. In Navigator, choose the Options menu, and then choose the General
       Preferences submenu.
    2. In the Preferences dialog box, select the Helpers tab.
    3. Select the Create New Type button.
    4. In the Configure New Mime Type dialog box, type "application" in
       the Mime Type text box, type "pdf" in the Mime SubType text box,
       then select OK.
    5. In the Preferences dialog box, select the Browse button.
    6. In the Source dialog box, navigate to the \acrobat3\reader (for
       32-bit) or \acrobat3\read16 (for 16-bit) directory, select the
       acrord32.exe (32-bit) or acrord16.exe (16-bit) file, then select
       Open.
    7. In the Preferences dialog box, type "pdf" in the File Extensions
       text box.
    8. Select the Launch the Application option, then select OK to close
       the Preferences dialog box.
    9. Choose Options > Save Options.

  Getting Started With Acrobat Access

   Once you have Acrobat Reader and the Acrobat Access plug-in installed,
   here are a few pointers to get you started.

     * Launch the Acrobat Reader.
       Instructions for Windows 3.1, Windows for Workgroups:

     From the Program Manager, select the Adobe Acrobat Program Group.
     Then, select the Acrobat Reader program item and press Enter or
     Return.
     Instructions for Windows 95 or Windows NT:
     Select the Start button from the Task Bar. From the pop-up menu,
     select Programs, and then Adobe Acrobat, and finally select Acrobat
     Reader and press Enter or Return.

     * To read the Access help file, choose the following menu sequence
       from the Acrobat menu:
       1) Help
       2) Plug-in Help
       3) Acrobat Access

     This menu sequence will open the Acrobat Access help file, which is
     a PDF document.
     TIP: If you don't see help for Acrobat Access in the plug-in help
     menu, you may have had some installation problems. Please try to
     reinstall Acrobat Access.
     TIP: If you get an error opening the help file, you may not have
     copied the help file to the help directory. You can instead open
     the file directly from the following directory:
     c:\acrobat3\reader\plug_ins\access.pdf

     * Finally, to bring up the Access view of this document, press
       <CONTROL>+Q simultaneously. At this point, your screen reading
       program should be able to read the Access view of the help file.
       The help file covers all of the features of Acrobat Access,
       including how to set up Acrobat so that the Access view is the
       default document view.

   More Tips: You are only one key stroke away from a quick reference for
   all of the Access commands:

     * <CONTROL> + 9 opens a quick reference for Access.

  How to Report Bugs or to Provide Feedback

   Please report bugs and provide feedback by sending an e-mail message
   to access-b@adobe.com. Please include the following information:

     * Name
     * Company Name
     * Address
     * E-mail address
     * Phone
     * Operating System
     * CPU
     * Screen Reading Program
     * Acrobat Version
     * Web Browser

----------
End of Document


-- 
TNET Mail to News Gateway
For information about this gateway, email info@tnet.com
Dimenet Network Page Generation Copyright (c) 2004-2005 DIMENET and TNET Services, Inc.
Module: archive.php - Version: 2.50 - Build: August 11 2013 01:08:58 MST
Valid HTML 4.01!   Valid CSS!